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Explore hriwrite's Instagram M57, or the Ring Nebula, is a planetary nebula, the glowing remains of a sun-like star. The tiny white dot in the center of the nebula is the star’s hot core, called a white dwarf. M57 is about 2,000 light-years away in the constellation Lyra, and is best observed during August. Discovered by the French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in 1779, the Ring Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8.8 and can be spotted with moderately sized telescopes. 
M57 is tilted toward Earth so that astronomers see the ring face-on. This gorgeous, high-resolution Hubble image helped astronomers determine that the nebula’s shape is more complicated than initially thought. The blue gas in the nebula’s center is actually a football-shaped structure seen end-on that pierces the red, doughnut-shaped material. The inner rim of the ring displays an intricate structure of dark, irregular knots of dense gas that the stellar winds have not yet been able to blow away. The knots and their tails look like spokes in a bicycle. 
This image of M57 has been colorized to illustrate the nebula’s chemical composition. The deep blue color in the center represents helium, the light blue color of the inner ring is the glow of hydrogen and oxygen, and the reddish color of the outer ring is from nitrogen and sulfur. #astrophotography #nature #earth #astronomy #space #landscapes #stargazing 1629594045483155814_4234627741

M57, or the Ring Nebula, is a planetary nebula, the glowing remains of a sun-like star. The tiny white dot in the center of the nebula is the star’s hot core, called a white dwarf. M57 is about 2,000 light-years away in the constellation Lyra, and is best observed during August. Discovered by the French astronomer Antoine Darquier de Pellepoix in 1779, the Ring Nebula has an apparent magnitude of 8.8 and can be spotted with moderately sized telescopes. M57 is tilted toward Earth so that astronomers see the ring face-on. This gorgeous, high-resolution Hubble image helped astronomers determine that the nebula’s shape is more complicated than initially thought. The blue gas in the nebula’s center is actually a football-shaped structure seen end-on that pierces the red, doughnut-shaped material. The inner rim of the ring displays an intricate structure of dark, irregular knots of dense gas that the stellar winds have not yet been able to blow away. The knots and their tails look like spokes in a bicycle. This image of M57 has been colorized to illustrate the nebula’s chemical composition. The deep blue color in the center represents helium, the light blue color of the inner ring is the glow of hydrogen and oxygen, and the reddish color of the outer ring is from nitrogen and sulfur. #astrophotography #nature #earth #astronomy #space #landscapes #stargazing

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Explore aspectscience's Instagram The space station was launched in 2011 with a primary purpose being to serve as a prototype for future generations of Chinese stations and support craft. It was announced in 2016 that the ability to correct the station’s altitude had been lost. Originally it was expected to hurtle to the ground late 2017 to mid 2018, but it is now thought we may have as little as around a month’s time . There is a small but real chance that pieces as large as 100 kg could reach the surface, whilst most of it will disintegrate and burn up on re-entry . But there’s probably no reason to be concerned as the chances are highest that it will make an ocean crash down instead of hitting land!
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 What’s your favourite space exploration moment? Let us know in the comments!
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Follow us, you don’t want to miss anything!
Image Source // SpaceFlight Insider 1629591888879245452_5787505120

The space station was launched in 2011 with a primary purpose being to serve as a prototype for future generations of Chinese stations and support craft. It was announced in 2016 that the ability to correct the station’s altitude had been lost. Originally it was expected to hurtle to the ground late 2017 to mid 2018, but it is now thought we may have as little as around a month’s time . There is a small but real chance that pieces as large as 100 kg could reach the surface, whilst most of it will disintegrate and burn up on re-entry . But there’s probably no reason to be concerned as the chances are highest that it will make an ocean crash down instead of hitting land! . . What’s your favourite space exploration moment? Let us know in the comments! . . ______________________________________________ . . . . Follow us, you don’t want to miss anything! Image Source // SpaceFlight Insider

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Explore andreainwonder's Instagram Frauenburg, XV century. Dear diary 18th Oct. It was night. The sky was full of twinkling stars. Nicolaus Copernicus told me about the Sun, the Earth and the rest of planets with one idea in his mind. He stopped the Sun to move the Earth
....................…................................................ Author PD: October is so sorry. She fell asleep, so late for a little girl... I told her to go to bed 1629589508546544870_258709685

Frauenburg, XV century. Dear diary 18th Oct. It was night. The sky was full of twinkling stars. Nicolaus Copernicus told me about the Sun, the Earth and the rest of planets with one idea in his mind. He stopped the Sun to move the Earth ....................…................................................ Author PD: October is so sorry. She fell asleep, so late for a little girl... I told her to go to bed

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Explore gladinafrica's Instagram @Regranned from @nasa -  View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye.

Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras.

Image credit: NASA/ESA + others
#nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation - #regrann 1629586646368691754_1487954818

@Regranned from @nasa - View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye. Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras. Image credit: NASA/ESA + others #nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation- #regrann

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Explore boba_fett25's Instagram #Repost @nasa
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View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye.

Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras.

Image credit: NASA/ESA + others
#nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation #supernova 1629587064112861754_678750515

#repost@nasa ・・・ View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye. Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras. Image credit: NASA/ESA + others #nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation #supernova

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Explore yxseadog's Instagram @Regranned from @nasa -  View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye.

Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras.

Image credit: NASA/ESA + others
#nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation - #regrann 1629584876180575342_5731743664

@Regranned from @nasa - View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye. Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras. Image credit: NASA/ESA + others #nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation- #regrann

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Explore spitthatout's Instagram #fascinating 
#Repost @nasa (@get_repost)
・・・
View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye.

Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras.

Image credit: NASA/ESA + others
#nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation 1629581785396465265_574265669

#fascinating #repost@nasa (@get_repost) ・・・ View these celestial beauties taken by the Hubble Space Telescope (@NASAHubble) and released as a set of modern views of the "Messier Catalog." Spotting comets was all the rage in the middle of the 18th century, and at the forefront of the comet hunt was a young French astronomer named Charles Messier. In 1774, in an effort to help fellow comet seekers steer clear of astronomical objects that were not comets (something that frustrated his own search for these elusive entities), Messier published the first version of his “Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters,” a collection of celestial objects that weren’t comets and should be avoided during comet hunting. Today, rather than avoiding these objects, many amateur astronomers actively seek them out as interesting targets to observe with backyard telescopes, binoculars or sometimes even with the naked eye. Hubble’s version of the Messier catalog includes eight newly processed images never before released by NASA. The images were extracted from more than 1.3 million observations that now reside in the Hubble data archive. Some of these images represent the first Hubble views of the objects, while others include newer, higher resolution images taken with Hubble’s latest cameras. Image credit: NASA/ESA + others #nasa #hubble #astronomy #science #cosmos #universe #celestialobject #stars #galaxies #nebula #telescope #nightsky #constellation

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Explore aglimpseofthemoon's Instagram @jamhourphotography was able to capture this photo of the waning crescent two days before new moon.
Thank you for using #aglimpseofthemoon and tagging @aglimpseofthemoon in your pic. 1629580014678755323_6022931920

@jamhourphotography was able to capture this photo of the waning crescent two days before new moon. Thank you for using #aglimpseofthemoonand tagging @aglimpseofthemoon in your pic.

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Explore galaxy_9_lightyears's Instagram Polaris, North star, Pole star
Brightest star in constellation Ursa Minor
Star is verry close to north celestial pole making it current north pole star.
Polaris is multiple star.
3 stars, main star Polaris A (big star) is yellow supergiant, second small one is Polaris B. 
3rd star Polaris Ab is not visible here because is to close to Polaris A.
Distance is from 323-433 light years

#polaris #northstar #dubblestar #astronomy #star #stellar #ursaminor 1629272261826827075_6055001726

Polaris, North star, Pole star Brightest star in constellation Ursa Minor Star is verry close to north celestial pole making it current north pole star. Polaris is multiple star. 3 stars, main star Polaris A (big star) is yellow supergiant, second small one is Polaris B. 3rd star Polaris Ab is not visible here because is to close to Polaris A. Distance is from 323-433 light years #polaris #northstar #dubblestar #astronomy #star #stellar #ursaminor

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