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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram A long shot initiative to turn California into three separate states has actually been making progress.
Golden State residents who support the effort will now be able to collect signatures in an attempt to allow the proposal on next year’s ballot, according to KABC.The plan, led by billionaire venture capitalist Tim Draper, calls for breaking California into northern, southern and coastal states. The northern state, aptly named Northern California, would include Sacramento and San Francisco. The coastal state of California would include Los Angeles, while Southern California would incorporate the cities of San Diego and Fresno. California Secretary of State Alex Padilla announced last week the details of the ballot initiative.

KNTV reported that the proposal requires 365,880 valid signatures to be placed onto the Nov. 2018 ballot. Supporters have 180 days to circulate petitions and the signatures will have to be submitted to elections officials by not later than April 23, 2018.

If enough signatures are produced, the next step would be for a majority of California voters to approve the measure. A final decision would then be made by members of Congress.All three hurdles make the proposal an unlikely endeavor.
Draper had pushed for a similar proposal back in 2014. He had previously called for California to be split into six states. That effort, however, failed.
Draper is again trying to split The Golden State up, suggesting that the economic and political diversity of the state has made it essentially ungovernable.
@westernjournalism 1637284496239578924_4081778651

A long shot initiative to turn California into three separate states has actually been making progress. Golden State residents who support the effort will now be able to collect signatures in an attempt to allow the proposal on next year’s ballot, according to KABC.The plan, led by billionaire venture capitalist Tim Draper, calls for breaking California into northern, southern and coastal states. The northern state, aptly named Northern California, would include Sacramento and San Francisco. The coastal state of California would include Los Angeles, while Southern California would incorporate the cities of San Diego and Fresno. California Secretary of State Alex Padilla announced last week the details of the ballot initiative. KNTV reported that the proposal requires 365,880 valid signatures to be placed onto the Nov. 2018 ballot. Supporters have 180 days to circulate petitions and the signatures will have to be submitted to elections officials by not later than April 23, 2018. If enough signatures are produced, the next step would be for a majority of California voters to approve the measure. A final decision would then be made by members of Congress.All three hurdles make the proposal an unlikely endeavor. Draper had pushed for a similar proposal back in 2014. He had previously called for California to be split into six states. That effort, however, failed. Draper is again trying to split The Golden State up, suggesting that the economic and political diversity of the state has made it essentially ungovernable. @westernjournalism

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram Helping drivers quit juggling
To really earn, drivers must invest in more than one phone to drive for both Uber and Lyft, and then must juggle the two while in motion to avoid losing the precious seconds between ride request (someone swiping up an Uber or Lyft) and ride acceptance (the driver committing to that customer).
Until Coakley conceived Mystro, no one had created a way to toggle between the two driver-facing apps on one phone. Coakley himself was one of those juggling drivers. He has a master's degree in Applied Physics from UCLA, but elected to ditch lab life to pursue a career in film. Driving for Uber afforded him the flexibility to craft a new career between rides. At least, it would have if he could count on consistent earnings. Joining Lyft as well to two-time Uber and its fickle rates did not make it easier: "Within a short period of time I started to realize how difficult it was trying to do that. I also realized how unsafe [it was] to toggle both phones while you're driving."Coakley started looking for an existing app, and then researched all modes of ride-hail entrepreneurship, asking around, and reading The Rideshare Guy blog. He realized he was going to have to create it himself, and find a way to crack Uber's code. That is, he'd have to find a way to run an end game around the master evader. Finding the investors (and ignoring the naysayers, including Uber)
Last year, Coakley started talking up his idea to anyone and everyone. "I started pitching to everyone who got in the car," he laughed. "Everyone said, 'I don't see how you would build it. Because you need the API. Uber and Lyft would shut it down.'"Mystro's now-Chief Technology Officer Matt Rajcok found a "workaround" (Coakley won't elaborate on their secret sauce) to prevent being disabled by Uber, and Coakley kept talking about his plans.
One of his Uber passengers in San Francisco had a friend with an angel fund who liked the idea, infusing the concept with $100,000 last fall. Coakley and Rajcok used the money to begin working full-time on a prototype in November 2016. @incmagazine see more 1637141213983080271_4081778651

Helping drivers quit juggling To really earn, drivers must invest in more than one phone to drive for both Uber and Lyft, and then must juggle the two while in motion to avoid losing the precious seconds between ride request (someone swiping up an Uber or Lyft) and ride acceptance (the driver committing to that customer). Until Coakley conceived Mystro, no one had created a way to toggle between the two driver-facing apps on one phone. Coakley himself was one of those juggling drivers. He has a master's degree in Applied Physics from UCLA, but elected to ditch lab life to pursue a career in film. Driving for Uber afforded him the flexibility to craft a new career between rides. At least, it would have if he could count on consistent earnings. Joining Lyft as well to two-time Uber and its fickle rates did not make it easier: "Within a short period of time I started to realize how difficult it was trying to do that. I also realized how unsafe [it was] to toggle both phones while you're driving."Coakley started looking for an existing app, and then researched all modes of ride-hail entrepreneurship, asking around, and reading The Rideshare Guy blog. He realized he was going to have to create it himself, and find a way to crack Uber's code. That is, he'd have to find a way to run an end game around the master evader. Finding the investors (and ignoring the naysayers, including Uber) Last year, Coakley started talking up his idea to anyone and everyone. "I started pitching to everyone who got in the car," he laughed. "Everyone said, 'I don't see how you would build it. Because you need the API. Uber and Lyft would shut it down.'"Mystro's now-Chief Technology Officer Matt Rajcok found a "workaround" (Coakley won't elaborate on their secret sauce) to prevent being disabled by Uber, and Coakley kept talking about his plans. One of his Uber passengers in San Francisco had a friend with an angel fund who liked the idea, infusing the concept with $100,000 last fall. Coakley and Rajcok used the money to begin working full-time on a prototype in November 2016. @incmagazine see more

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram After pushback from conservative news outlets as well as the Fraternal Order of Police, the National Park Service has taken back $98,000 in funding for a seemingly green-lit project by a University of California, Berkeley, professor documenting the Black Panther Party.As reported by The Root, the Park Service said the project, “Black Panther Party Research, Interpretation & Memory Project” was to “memorialize a history that brought meaning to lives far beyond the San Francisco Bay Area” and was slated to run from Aug. 30, 2017, to Sept. 30, 2019. But after the FOP sent an Oct. 19 letter to President Donald Trump, the governmental agency quietly reneged, saying, in part, that the funds were never finalized. “At present, I can confirm that the project in question will not receive funding from the National Park Service,” Park Service spokesman Craig Dalby said.
Chuck Canterbury, national FOP president, wrote in his letter to the president, that U.S. Park Ranger Kenneth Patrick was killed by Veronza Leon Curtis Bowers Jr., who was affiliated with the Black Panther Party. Patrick was shot and killed in August 1973.
Canterbury called the Black Panther Party—an organization that fought against rampant police brutality and provided free breakfast to children—“a violent and repugnant organization” that “Ranger Patrick’s own agency now proposes to partner with.”
According to the original proposal, the project sought to document “how the BPP impacted the visual arts, music, dance and styles of the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s and underscore the vastness of its impact on American culture.”According to the East Bay Times, Ula Taylor, the incoming chair of Berkeley’s African-American studies department and lead investigator for the project, is co-author of Panther: A Pictorial History of the Black Panther Party and the Story Behind the Film and served as a historical consultant on the Mario Van Peebles’ film Panther.
No word on where the project now stands. @eastbaytimes 1637129472624756772_4081778651

After pushback from conservative news outlets as well as the Fraternal Order of Police, the National Park Service has taken back $98,000 in funding for a seemingly green-lit project by a University of California, Berkeley, professor documenting the Black Panther Party.As reported by The Root, the Park Service said the project, “Black Panther Party Research, Interpretation & Memory Project” was to “memorialize a history that brought meaning to lives far beyond the San Francisco Bay Area” and was slated to run from Aug. 30, 2017, to Sept. 30, 2019. But after the FOP sent an Oct. 19 letter to President Donald Trump, the governmental agency quietly reneged, saying, in part, that the funds were never finalized. “At present, I can confirm that the project in question will not receive funding from the National Park Service,” Park Service spokesman Craig Dalby said. Chuck Canterbury, national FOP president, wrote in his letter to the president, that U.S. Park Ranger Kenneth Patrick was killed by Veronza Leon Curtis Bowers Jr., who was affiliated with the Black Panther Party. Patrick was shot and killed in August 1973. Canterbury called the Black Panther Party—an organization that fought against rampant police brutality and provided free breakfast to children—“a violent and repugnant organization” that “Ranger Patrick’s own agency now proposes to partner with.” According to the original proposal, the project sought to document “how the BPP impacted the visual arts, music, dance and styles of the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s and underscore the vastness of its impact on American culture.”According to the East Bay Times, Ula Taylor, the incoming chair of Berkeley’s African-American studies department and lead investigator for the project, is co-author of Panther: A Pictorial History of the Black Panther Party and the Story Behind the Film and served as a historical consultant on the Mario Van Peebles’ film Panther. No word on where the project now stands. @eastbaytimes

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram Samsung read the last e-waste report from Greenpeace too, and likely wasn't too happy about the slamming it got from the organization. Which leads us to the Korean electronics juggernaut's system for upcycling old phones. Specifically, the company rigged a bunch of them together and turned them into a bitcoin mining contraption. According to Motherboard, Samsung strung 40 Galaxy S5 together to mine recently, and apparently just eight of them wired together can mine in a way that's more power-efficient than a desktop computer.
Samsung also repurposed an S3 into a fishtank monitor and a Galaxy tablet into an Ubuntu laptop among other experiments. Motherboard says that Samsung plans to release the software that'll unlock the phones and the software needed to replicate these functions at home soon enough. If you're curious, you can check out Github for more information.
In the meantime, Samsung still has one of the lowest scores for battery adhesion and requiring special repair tools. So, while this might be a PR win, the company still has a long way to go (as do others) before it can truly be considered anything resembling "green" or "sustainable."
@engadget 1637123313960365265_4081778651

Samsung read the last e-waste report from Greenpeace too, and likely wasn't too happy about the slamming it got from the organization. Which leads us to the Korean electronics juggernaut's system for upcycling old phones. Specifically, the company rigged a bunch of them together and turned them into a bitcoin mining contraption. According to Motherboard, Samsung strung 40 Galaxy S5 together to mine recently, and apparently just eight of them wired together can mine in a way that's more power-efficient than a desktop computer. Samsung also repurposed an S3 into a fishtank monitor and a Galaxy tablet into an Ubuntu laptop among other experiments. Motherboard says that Samsung plans to release the software that'll unlock the phones and the software needed to replicate these functions at home soon enough. If you're curious, you can check out Github for more information. In the meantime, Samsung still has one of the lowest scores for battery adhesion and requiring special repair tools. So, while this might be a PR win, the company still has a long way to go (as do others) before it can truly be considered anything resembling "green" or "sustainable." @engadget

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram A toddler who was prevented from receiving a kidney transplant from his father was reportedly rushed to an emergency room Sunday with an abdominal infection.
Two-year-old A.J. Burgess was set to receive the transplant earlier this month when his father, who is a match, said he was told he had to wait to donate a kidney following a probation violation and stint in county jail. The incident has prompted questions and concerns in a case that one expert has called befuddling.
The family's attorney, Mawuli Davis, said A.J. was admitted into the hospital Sunday with peritonitis, an inflammation of the tissue lining the inner wall of the abdomen caused by a bacterial or fungal infection.
He said the young boy, who was whimpering in pain, is now being treated with antibiotics. “Every day he goes without the transplant is a day he suffers,” he told The Washington Post.
[A 2-year-old’s kidney transplant was put on hold — after his donor father’s probation violation]
The boy's father, Anthony Dickerson, who was on probation, was arrested days before the scheduled transplant earlier this month on charges of possession of a firearm and fleeing or attempting to elude police, authorities said.
Shannon Volkodav, a spokeswoman for the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office, previously said that Dickerson was released from Gwinnett County Jail so that he could undergo the surgery.
But the family's attorney said that after Dickerson's release, the transplant center at Emory University Hospital said the surgery had been put on hold, pending compliance with his parole. “That's all I ever wanted was a son,” the 26-year-old father told NBC affiliate WXIA following the hospital's decision earlier this month. “And I finally got him, and he's in this situation.”
The family told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that medical personnel sent a letter to jail authorities, requesting that Dickerson be escorted to Emory for a preoperative appointment so he could continue with the scheduled surgery. The next day, A.J.'s mother provided authorities with the necessary documentation showing that Dickerson was scheduled to donate a kidney on Oct. 3, said Volkodav, with the sheriff’s office.@washingtonpost 1637116534178277164_4081778651

A toddler who was prevented from receiving a kidney transplant from his father was reportedly rushed to an emergency room Sunday with an abdominal infection. Two-year-old A.J. Burgess was set to receive the transplant earlier this month when his father, who is a match, said he was told he had to wait to donate a kidney following a probation violation and stint in county jail. The incident has prompted questions and concerns in a case that one expert has called befuddling. The family's attorney, Mawuli Davis, said A.J. was admitted into the hospital Sunday with peritonitis, an inflammation of the tissue lining the inner wall of the abdomen caused by a bacterial or fungal infection. He said the young boy, who was whimpering in pain, is now being treated with antibiotics. “Every day he goes without the transplant is a day he suffers,” he told The Washington Post. [A 2-year-old’s kidney transplant was put on hold — after his donor father’s probation violation] The boy's father, Anthony Dickerson, who was on probation, was arrested days before the scheduled transplant earlier this month on charges of possession of a firearm and fleeing or attempting to elude police, authorities said. Shannon Volkodav, a spokeswoman for the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office, previously said that Dickerson was released from Gwinnett County Jail so that he could undergo the surgery. But the family's attorney said that after Dickerson's release, the transplant center at Emory University Hospital said the surgery had been put on hold, pending compliance with his parole. “That's all I ever wanted was a son,” the 26-year-old father told NBC affiliate WXIA following the hospital's decision earlier this month. “And I finally got him, and he's in this situation.” The family told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that medical personnel sent a letter to jail authorities, requesting that Dickerson be escorted to Emory for a preoperative appointment so he could continue with the scheduled surgery. The next day, A.J.'s mother provided authorities with the necessary documentation showing that Dickerson was scheduled to donate a kidney on Oct. 3, said Volkodav, with the sheriff’s [email protected]

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram The $42 billion company behind Corona, Modelo, and Svedka is betting on marijuana’s national legalization. Constellation Brands stz-b announced Monday that it had agreed to take a 9.9% minority stake in the $2 billion Canadian medical marijuana company Canopy Growth. The stake is worth about $191 million, though Constellation will have the option of purchasing additional stakes in the future.
Using Canopy’s expertise, Constellation is attempting to create cannabis-infused drinks, the Wall Street Journal reported after an interview with Constellation’s CEO. “Canopy Growth has a seasoned leadership team that understands the legal, regulatory and economic landscape for an emerging market that is predicted to become a significant consumer category in the future,” said Constellation Brands CEO Rob Sands in a statement. “Our company’s success is the result of our focus on identifying early stage consumer trends, and this is another step in that direction.”The wines and spirits conglomerate has no intention of selling cannabis products in the U.S. until it is legal nationwide. But the company is betting that legalization is just a matter of time, according to the Journal.

However, Constellation may soon sell the marijuana drink product in Canada, where legalization of edible and drinkable cannabis products is expected by 2019.

The move comes amid signs that suggest some consumers are reducing alcohol usage in favor of cannabis. “We believe alcohol could be under pressure for the next decade,” Cowen analysts led by Viven Azer wrote in an April note. “Consumer survey work suggests [about] 80% of consumers reduce their alcohol consumption with cannabis in the mix.” @timeinccareers 1637105751864124537_4081778651

The $42 billion company behind Corona, Modelo, and Svedka is betting on marijuana’s national legalization. Constellation Brands stz-b announced Monday that it had agreed to take a 9.9% minority stake in the $2 billion Canadian medical marijuana company Canopy Growth. The stake is worth about $191 million, though Constellation will have the option of purchasing additional stakes in the future. Using Canopy’s expertise, Constellation is attempting to create cannabis-infused drinks, the Wall Street Journal reported after an interview with Constellation’s CEO. “Canopy Growth has a seasoned leadership team that understands the legal, regulatory and economic landscape for an emerging market that is predicted to become a significant consumer category in the future,” said Constellation Brands CEO Rob Sands in a statement. “Our company’s success is the result of our focus on identifying early stage consumer trends, and this is another step in that direction.”The wines and spirits conglomerate has no intention of selling cannabis products in the U.S. until it is legal nationwide. But the company is betting that legalization is just a matter of time, according to the Journal. However, Constellation may soon sell the marijuana drink product in Canada, where legalization of edible and drinkable cannabis products is expected by 2019. The move comes amid signs that suggest some consumers are reducing alcohol usage in favor of cannabis. “We believe alcohol could be under pressure for the next decade,” Cowen analysts led by Viven Azer wrote in an April note. “Consumer survey work suggests [about] 80% of consumers reduce their alcohol consumption with cannabis in the mix.” @timeinccareers

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram A few years ago in California, a professional cartoonist, a designer of golf putters, a surfer, and a self-professed geek got together and formed a company. No, this isn’t the start of a bad joke, it’s the very real story of four guys and one good idea — a story of grassroots entrepreneurship and the struggle of the little guy against the tides of global e-commerce. These four Californians who couldn’t have been more different bonded together over the simple fact that they were all dads who shared a similar struggle when bathing their babies. They decided that together they would solve this problem, and they set to work developing a specialized pillow that could be inserted into a sink or tub that would hold their babies in place. They called it the Blooming Bath.
They then patented the product, trademarked it, passed it through all of the required materials and safety tests, and eventually took it to market. Almost immediately, sales and major design awards began rolling in, and, for a moment, it appeared as if these four random dads from California had it made: "When you can take a problem and solve it, that feels great. And when you can take a problem and solve it for a lot of other people, that feels even better. But when you can take a problem and turn the answer into something that's just so darn adorable - well, there's just no topping that."
Perhaps unfortunately, Chinese counterfeiters also found the Blooming Bath adorable — so darn adorable, in fact, that they decided to copy it and sell it themselves on Amazon and Ebay.
“Unfortunately, the everyday workload of building and running a new business had us overlooking the very large problem of counterfeiters,” Tiffany Pond, the wife of one of the creators of the Blooming Bath explained to me. “These [counterfeits] have popped up by a half dozen different names by thousands of sellers, but all using our photos, designs, and trademarks to market their items. We have a store on Amazon and counterfeits have been able to attach themselves to our page, violating all of our intellectual property.” @forbes 1637104123106938754_4081778651

A few years ago in California, a professional cartoonist, a designer of golf putters, a surfer, and a self-professed geek got together and formed a company. No, this isn’t the start of a bad joke, it’s the very real story of four guys and one good idea — a story of grassroots entrepreneurship and the struggle of the little guy against the tides of global e-commerce. These four Californians who couldn’t have been more different bonded together over the simple fact that they were all dads who shared a similar struggle when bathing their babies. They decided that together they would solve this problem, and they set to work developing a specialized pillow that could be inserted into a sink or tub that would hold their babies in place. They called it the Blooming Bath. They then patented the product, trademarked it, passed it through all of the required materials and safety tests, and eventually took it to market. Almost immediately, sales and major design awards began rolling in, and, for a moment, it appeared as if these four random dads from California had it made: "When you can take a problem and solve it, that feels great. And when you can take a problem and solve it for a lot of other people, that feels even better. But when you can take a problem and turn the answer into something that's just so darn adorable - well, there's just no topping that." Perhaps unfortunately, Chinese counterfeiters also found the Blooming Bath adorable — so darn adorable, in fact, that they decided to copy it and sell it themselves on Amazon and Ebay. “Unfortunately, the everyday workload of building and running a new business had us overlooking the very large problem of counterfeiters,” Tiffany Pond, the wife of one of the creators of the Blooming Bath explained to me. “These [counterfeits] have popped up by a half dozen different names by thousands of sellers, but all using our photos, designs, and trademarks to market their items. We have a store on Amazon and counterfeits have been able to attach themselves to our page, violating all of our intellectual property.” @forbes

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram Unlike most lists of the highest-performing states, inclusion on this one might not be the best thing ever. If there’s one thing that puts a dampener on fun, it’s a sexually transmitted disease.
They spread like wildfire, and while many of them are easy to cure with a quick round of antibiotics, they’re not something that anyone enjoys having to deal with.
So Alaska had better keep an eye out, because it’s the most sexually diseased state in America. Maybe it’s the long winter nights or the cold weather, but Alaskans should be careful when they’re involved in affairs of the heart.
Coming in at number two, we have Mississippi, and at number three, there’s Louisiana, which, coincidentally, is right next door.
Georgia is fourth, New Mexico fifth, North Carolina takes sixth and seventh goes to South Carolina. We’re starting to see a pattern here in the American south…Eighth is Arkansas, ninth, Delaware and Oklahoma takes the tenth spot. The least diseased state is Vermont, followed by New Hampshire at 49 and West Virginia at 48. The number 25 spot goes to Virginia.

The map, created by backgroundchecks.org, uses colours to show the scale of sexually transmitted diseases in each state.

The darker pink each state is, the more diseases it has.

The map was posted on Reddit by user, alectprasad.

How did your state do?

If you want more information on sexually transmitted diseases, head to the sexual health charities FPA and Planned Parenthood, where you can get non-judgemental and accurate advice on how to prevent sexually transmitted infections and what to do if you think you might have come into contact with one.

Getting tested is no big deal, and many STIs are easy to treat. Don’t be embarrassed or put off getting advice if you think you need help – there’s nothing to be ashamed off and it’s always better to be safe than sorry. @culturetrip 1636795627736013788_4081778651

Unlike most lists of the highest-performing states, inclusion on this one might not be the best thing ever. If there’s one thing that puts a dampener on fun, it’s a sexually transmitted disease. They spread like wildfire, and while many of them are easy to cure with a quick round of antibiotics, they’re not something that anyone enjoys having to deal with. So Alaska had better keep an eye out, because it’s the most sexually diseased state in America. Maybe it’s the long winter nights or the cold weather, but Alaskans should be careful when they’re involved in affairs of the heart. Coming in at number two, we have Mississippi, and at number three, there’s Louisiana, which, coincidentally, is right next door. Georgia is fourth, New Mexico fifth, North Carolina takes sixth and seventh goes to South Carolina. We’re starting to see a pattern here in the American south…Eighth is Arkansas, ninth, Delaware and Oklahoma takes the tenth spot. The least diseased state is Vermont, followed by New Hampshire at 49 and West Virginia at 48. The number 25 spot goes to Virginia. The map, created by backgroundchecks.org, uses colours to show the scale of sexually transmitted diseases in each state. The darker pink each state is, the more diseases it has. The map was posted on Reddit by user, alectprasad. How did your state do? If you want more information on sexually transmitted diseases, head to the sexual health charities FPA and Planned Parenthood, where you can get non-judgemental and accurate advice on how to prevent sexually transmitted infections and what to do if you think you might have come into contact with one. Getting tested is no big deal, and many STIs are easy to treat. Don’t be embarrassed or put off getting advice if you think you need help – there’s nothing to be ashamed off and it’s always better to be safe than sorry. @culturetrip

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram Ready or not, California kicks off recreational marijuana sales on Jan. 1. And, mostly, it's not.

Los Angeles and San Francisco are among many cities still struggling to fashion local rules for pot shops and growers. Without the regulations, there could be limited options in many places for consumers eager to ring in the new year with a legal pot purchase. "The bulk of folks probably are not going to be ready Jan. 1," conceded Cara Martinson of the California State Association of Counties. In general, California will treat cannabis like alcohol, allowing people 21 and older to legally possess up to an ounce and grow six marijuana plants at home. Come January, the newly legalized recreational sales will be merged with the state's two-decade-old medical marijuana market, which is also coming under much stronger regulation.

But big gaps loom in the system intended to move cannabis from the field to distribution centers, then to testing labs and eventually retail shops.

The state intends to issue only temporary licenses starting in January, and it has yet to release its plan to govern the estimated $7 billion marketplace, the nation's largest legal pot economy.

If businesses aren't licensed and operating in the legal market, governments aren't collecting their slice of revenue from sales. The state alone estimates it could see as much as $1 billion roll in within several years.

Operators have complained about what they see as potential conflicts in various laws and rules, or seemingly contradictory plans.

The state expects businesses that receive licenses will only work with others that hold them. But that has alarmed operators who wonder what will happen if their supplier, for instance, decides not to join the new legal market.

Others say it's not clear what could happen in cities that don't enact pot laws, which they warn could open a loophole for businesses to set up shop. Some communities have banned recreational sales completely.

Most banks continue to refuse to do business with marijuana operators - pot remains illegal under federal law - and there are also problems obtaining insurance.
@sfgate 1636775538445799098_4081778651

Ready or not, California kicks off recreational marijuana sales on Jan. 1. And, mostly, it's not. Los Angeles and San Francisco are among many cities still struggling to fashion local rules for pot shops and growers. Without the regulations, there could be limited options in many places for consumers eager to ring in the new year with a legal pot purchase. "The bulk of folks probably are not going to be ready Jan. 1," conceded Cara Martinson of the California State Association of Counties. In general, California will treat cannabis like alcohol, allowing people 21 and older to legally possess up to an ounce and grow six marijuana plants at home. Come January, the newly legalized recreational sales will be merged with the state's two-decade-old medical marijuana market, which is also coming under much stronger regulation. But big gaps loom in the system intended to move cannabis from the field to distribution centers, then to testing labs and eventually retail shops. The state intends to issue only temporary licenses starting in January, and it has yet to release its plan to govern the estimated $7 billion marketplace, the nation's largest legal pot economy. If businesses aren't licensed and operating in the legal market, governments aren't collecting their slice of revenue from sales. The state alone estimates it could see as much as $1 billion roll in within several years. Operators have complained about what they see as potential conflicts in various laws and rules, or seemingly contradictory plans. The state expects businesses that receive licenses will only work with others that hold them. But that has alarmed operators who wonder what will happen if their supplier, for instance, decides not to join the new legal market. Others say it's not clear what could happen in cities that don't enact pot laws, which they warn could open a loophole for businesses to set up shop. Some communities have banned recreational sales completely. Most banks continue to refuse to do business with marijuana operators - pot remains illegal under federal law - and there are also problems obtaining insurance. @sfgate

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram 22-year-old woman died after a 12-year-old boy jumped off of an overpass and landed on her car, Saturday.
The boy, who has not been named, jumped off of Cedar Lane overpass in Virginia and landed on Marisa W. Harris’ 2005 Ford Escape, according to a press release provided to PEOPLE by the Virginia State Police Department. A 23-year-old male passenger who was traveling with Harris managed to grab the steering wheel and direct the vehicle off of the interstate.
Harris, of Olney, Maryland, died at the scene, while the passenger was uninjured. The boy was transported to Fairfax Inova Hospital where he is being treated for life-threatening injuries. Harris’ family told The Washington Post that she was pursuing her master’s degree in clinical counseling at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. They said she had a gift for working with children with severe behavioral problems.
“She was caring — I mean she had an absolute love for children,” Leigh Miller, Harris’ mother, said. Her father, Patrick Harris, told the Post he wasn’t ignorant about the circumstances of her death.
“That’s the irony that we’re looking at right now,” he said, describing Marisa as outgoing, with an affinity for the outdoors. “She was fearless, she was absolutely fearless. She was loved by her friends, she was dearly loved by her family, she was admired by her peers, she was just a shining star.”
As for her passion in helping children, her loved ones said it ran in the family as Marisa came from a “long line of psychologists.” “She was — she was awesome,” her mother said. “I miss her so much.” @people 1636771078390720770_4081778651

22-year-old woman died after a 12-year-old boy jumped off of an overpass and landed on her car, Saturday. The boy, who has not been named, jumped off of Cedar Lane overpass in Virginia and landed on Marisa W. Harris’ 2005 Ford Escape, according to a press release provided to PEOPLE by the Virginia State Police Department. A 23-year-old male passenger who was traveling with Harris managed to grab the steering wheel and direct the vehicle off of the interstate. Harris, of Olney, Maryland, died at the scene, while the passenger was uninjured. The boy was transported to Fairfax Inova Hospital where he is being treated for life-threatening injuries. Harris’ family told The Washington Post that she was pursuing her master’s degree in clinical counseling at Marymount University in Arlington, Virginia. They said she had a gift for working with children with severe behavioral problems. “She was caring — I mean she had an absolute love for children,” Leigh Miller, Harris’ mother, said. Her father, Patrick Harris, told the Post he wasn’t ignorant about the circumstances of her death. “That’s the irony that we’re looking at right now,” he said, describing Marisa as outgoing, with an affinity for the outdoors. “She was fearless, she was absolutely fearless. She was loved by her friends, she was dearly loved by her family, she was admired by her peers, she was just a shining star.” As for her passion in helping children, her loved ones said it ran in the family as Marisa came from a “long line of psychologists.” “She was — she was awesome,” her mother said. “I miss her so much.” @people

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram But they're still classed as Schedule 1 illicit drugs.  Psychedelics have recently made headlines for their potential to treat illnesses such as depression and cluster headaches - and now a now study has found that drugs such as magic mushrooms, LSD, and the active ingredient in peyote could potentially offer a way to prevent violent crime.A team of researchers looked at 13 years worth of data from the US National Survey on Drug Use and Health across 480,000 respondents, and found that having ever used psychedelic drugs contributed to significant decreases in the odds that that individual would later commit a crime. Psychedelic, or hallucinogenic, drugs are substances that alter your perceptions of the world around you.

Magic mushrooms (which trigger hallucinations through the ingredient psilocybin), LSD, and peyote (which contains the hallucinogen mescaline) are often used recreationally, and have been used for religious purposes for centuries.

Now there's a growing body of research that suggests they may also be powerful medical tools.

LSD has proven effective at reducing cluster headaches, for instance. Psilocybin has demonstrated, several times, that it can ease the symptoms of severe depression and anxiety. However, they're still classed as Schedule 1 drugs in the US - with no currently accepted medical use, and therefore illegal.

Yet in a slightly ironic twist, the numbers suggest that there is actually some connection between lower crime rates and psychedelic use - in particular, psilocybin, according to the results of the study.

People who reported having ever used psychedelic drugs had: a 27 percent decrease in the likelihood of committing larceny or theft; a 22 percent decrease in the odds of arrest for property crime; an 18 percent decrease in the odds of arrest for violent crime; and a 12 percent decrease in the odds for committing assault.
Read more @sciencealert .com 1636014897489668684_4081778651

But they're still classed as Schedule 1 illicit drugs. Psychedelics have recently made headlines for their potential to treat illnesses such as depression and cluster headaches - and now a now study has found that drugs such as magic mushrooms, LSD, and the active ingredient in peyote could potentially offer a way to prevent violent crime.A team of researchers looked at 13 years worth of data from the US National Survey on Drug Use and Health across 480,000 respondents, and found that having ever used psychedelic drugs contributed to significant decreases in the odds that that individual would later commit a crime. Psychedelic, or hallucinogenic, drugs are substances that alter your perceptions of the world around you. Magic mushrooms (which trigger hallucinations through the ingredient psilocybin), LSD, and peyote (which contains the hallucinogen mescaline) are often used recreationally, and have been used for religious purposes for centuries. Now there's a growing body of research that suggests they may also be powerful medical tools. LSD has proven effective at reducing cluster headaches, for instance. Psilocybin has demonstrated, several times, that it can ease the symptoms of severe depression and anxiety. However, they're still classed as Schedule 1 drugs in the US - with no currently accepted medical use, and therefore illegal. Yet in a slightly ironic twist, the numbers suggest that there is actually some connection between lower crime rates and psychedelic use - in particular, psilocybin, according to the results of the study. People who reported having ever used psychedelic drugs had: a 27 percent decrease in the likelihood of committing larceny or theft; a 22 percent decrease in the odds of arrest for property crime; an 18 percent decrease in the odds of arrest for violent crime; and a 12 percent decrease in the odds for committing assault. Read more @sciencealert .com

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram For the last year, the people of Hangzhou, China – a city of more than nine million – have had every moment of their lives tracked. “City Brain,” an artificial intelligence system that interlinks with a city’s infrastructure was installed in October 2016, through a partnership with Alibaba and Foxconn. In an effort to optimize Hangzhou and make urban life easier, the system tracked everything from robberies to traffic jams and learned the city’s unique patterns and needs.

Residents were also tracked through their activity on social media. Their commutes, purchases, interactions and movements were all learned and absorbed by the AI database.
“In China, people have less concern with privacy, which allows us to move faster,” Xian-Sheng Hua, an AI manager at Alibaba, said during a presentation at the World Summit AI meeting in early October. And, according to New Scientist, the system works.

Crime, car crashes and rush hour traffic is all down. The system can predict traffic jams and adjust the traffic lights in order to avoid congestion before it begins. It can also keep track of criminals, making it easier for police to catch them. And it automatically notifies authorities when it detects so much as an illegally parked car.

The system is also hooked up to residents’ cell phones and can alert them of bad weather or traffic jams and offer safer routes.

City Brain has apparently been such a success that it’s already being packaged for other cities across China and, eventually, the world. 1634931718280427117_4081778651

For the last year, the people of Hangzhou, China – a city of more than nine million – have had every moment of their lives tracked. “City Brain,” an artificial intelligence system that interlinks with a city’s infrastructure was installed in October 2016, through a partnership with Alibaba and Foxconn. In an effort to optimize Hangzhou and make urban life easier, the system tracked everything from robberies to traffic jams and learned the city’s unique patterns and needs. Residents were also tracked through their activity on social media. Their commutes, purchases, interactions and movements were all learned and absorbed by the AI database. “In China, people have less concern with privacy, which allows us to move faster,” Xian-Sheng Hua, an AI manager at Alibaba, said during a presentation at the World Summit AI meeting in early October. And, according to New Scientist, the system works. Crime, car crashes and rush hour traffic is all down. The system can predict traffic jams and adjust the traffic lights in order to avoid congestion before it begins. It can also keep track of criminals, making it easier for police to catch them. And it automatically notifies authorities when it detects so much as an illegally parked car. The system is also hooked up to residents’ cell phones and can alert them of bad weather or traffic jams and offer safer routes. City Brain has apparently been such a success that it’s already being packaged for other cities across China and, eventually, the world.

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram The Kodi box pitch is hard to resist. A little black plastic square, in look not much different from a Roku or Apple TV, and similar in function as well. This streamer, though, offers something those others never will: Free access to practically any show or movie you can dream of. No rental fees. No subscriptions. Just type in the name of a blockbuster, and start watching a high-definition stream in seconds.For years, piracy persisted mainly in the realm of torrents, with sites like The Pirate Bay and Demonoid connecting internet denizens to premium content gratis. But a confluence of factors have sent torrent usage plummeting from 23 percent of all North American daily internet traffic in 2011 to under 5 percent last year. Legal crackdowns shuttered prominent torrent sites. Paid alternatives like Netflix and Hulu made it easier just to pay up. And then there were the "fully loaded" Kodi boxes—otherwise vanilla streaming devices that come with, or make easily accessible, so-called addons that seek out unlicensed content—that deliver pirated movies and TV shows with push-button ease. "Kodi and the plugin system and the people who made these plugins have just dumbed down the process," says Dan Deeth, spokesperson for network-equipment company Sandvine. "It's easy for anyone to use. It's kind of set it and forget it. Like the Ron Popeil turkey roaster."
Kodi itself is just a media player; the majority of addons aren't piracy focused, and lots of Kodi devices without illicit software plug-ins are utterly uncontroversial. Still, that Kodi has swallowed piracy may not surprise some of you; a full six percent of North American households have a Kodi device configured to access unlicensed content, according to a recent Sandvine study. But the story of how a popular, open-source media player called XBMC became a pirate's paradise might. And with a legal crackdown looming, the Kodi ecosystem's present may matter less than its uncertain future.read more @wired .com 1634921839377353420_4081778651

The Kodi box pitch is hard to resist. A little black plastic square, in look not much different from a Roku or Apple TV, and similar in function as well. This streamer, though, offers something those others never will: Free access to practically any show or movie you can dream of. No rental fees. No subscriptions. Just type in the name of a blockbuster, and start watching a high-definition stream in seconds.For years, piracy persisted mainly in the realm of torrents, with sites like The Pirate Bay and Demonoid connecting internet denizens to premium content gratis. But a confluence of factors have sent torrent usage plummeting from 23 percent of all North American daily internet traffic in 2011 to under 5 percent last year. Legal crackdowns shuttered prominent torrent sites. Paid alternatives like Netflix and Hulu made it easier just to pay up. And then there were the "fully loaded" Kodi boxes—otherwise vanilla streaming devices that come with, or make easily accessible, so-called addons that seek out unlicensed content—that deliver pirated movies and TV shows with push-button ease. "Kodi and the plugin system and the people who made these plugins have just dumbed down the process," says Dan Deeth, spokesperson for network-equipment company Sandvine. "It's easy for anyone to use. It's kind of set it and forget it. Like the Ron Popeil turkey roaster." Kodi itself is just a media player; the majority of addons aren't piracy focused, and lots of Kodi devices without illicit software plug-ins are utterly uncontroversial. Still, that Kodi has swallowed piracy may not surprise some of you; a full six percent of North American households have a Kodi device configured to access unlicensed content, according to a recent Sandvine study. But the story of how a popular, open-source media player called XBMC became a pirate's paradise might. And with a legal crackdown looming, the Kodi ecosystem's present may matter less than its uncertain future.read more @wired .com

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram A recent fire at an illegal marijuana grow house in Hayward imperiled half a million dollars worth of marijuana plants before they were discovered and seized by police.Attention was drawn to the grow house on Friday, Oct. 20, when a resident of a nearby home on Tioga Road noticed a fire at the house's electric meter and called 911 to report it, according to the Hayward Police Department. The concerned neighbor who reported the fire and Hayward firefighters both worked to extinguish the blaze, but when firefighters made contact with a resident to check that the fire had not spread to the walls or attic, they learned the home was being used to grow hundreds of marijuana plants and called the police department, police said.When officers from the Narcotics Unit searched the house, they found more than 400 plants weighing over 300 pounds, and estimated the street value at more than half a million dollars. "The conversion of a home to an illegal marijuana grow can be a dangerous operation creating significant fire and ecological hazards to a neighborhood," police said in a statement released Wednesday, adding that electrical circuits can overload and burst into flames, chemical fertilizers can pose a health hazard and the amount of water demanded by the plants can strain local resources.

Police thanked the resident who spotted the fire for "preventing a serious catastrophe." Read @sfgate .com 1634649360754966158_4081778651

A recent fire at an illegal marijuana grow house in Hayward imperiled half a million dollars worth of marijuana plants before they were discovered and seized by police.Attention was drawn to the grow house on Friday, Oct. 20, when a resident of a nearby home on Tioga Road noticed a fire at the house's electric meter and called 911 to report it, according to the Hayward Police Department. The concerned neighbor who reported the fire and Hayward firefighters both worked to extinguish the blaze, but when firefighters made contact with a resident to check that the fire had not spread to the walls or attic, they learned the home was being used to grow hundreds of marijuana plants and called the police department, police said.When officers from the Narcotics Unit searched the house, they found more than 400 plants weighing over 300 pounds, and estimated the street value at more than half a million dollars. "The conversion of a home to an illegal marijuana grow can be a dangerous operation creating significant fire and ecological hazards to a neighborhood," police said in a statement released Wednesday, adding that electrical circuits can overload and burst into flames, chemical fertilizers can pose a health hazard and the amount of water demanded by the plants can strain local resources. Police thanked the resident who spotted the fire for "preventing a serious catastrophe." Read @sfgate .com

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram Eager to stiffen its crackdown on an out-of-control fare-evasion problem that’s costing BART an estimated $25 million a year, the transit system’s Board of Directors voted Thursday night to start a proof of payment system that would require riders to show tickets to fare inspectors or police.
Despite earlier concerns about the possibility of biased enforcement, directors unanimously approved an ordinance allowing random fare inspections along with a companion ordinance that permits juveniles to be fined without gaining a criminal record.“Fare-paying passengers are uniform in their support for fairness,” said Director Robert Raburn of Oakland. “They don’t want to see people skipping through and not paying anything.”Beginning Jan. 1, BART riders inside the paid areas of stations and aboard trains will be required, if asked, to prove they’ve paid by handing their paper tickets or Clipper cards to fare inspectors or police, who will use electronic devices to read them. Adult violators could face fines of up to $120, and youths ages 5 to 17 could be subject to $60 fines.

The board, however, agreed to initially limit fines to $75 for adults and $60 for youths. During the first month, warnings will be issued instead of citations. Under the ordinance, low-income earners who are cited will be able to perform community service instead of paying a fine.

The goal is to deter fare evaders, who vault the system’s gates or pass through its often-unmonitored swing gates to gain free access.

BART officials estimate that fare evasion costs them at least $25 million a year in lost revenue, though they acknowledge that they don’t really know the extent of the problem.

What they do know, however, points to widespread abuse.

Automated cameras installed to watch just one of 12 swinging gates at Embarcadero Station tallied 600 people sneaking into BART free in a single day. Gate-jumpers and people who sneak in behind a paying customer are common in many stations.

Fare evaders can be cited now only at fare gates or other barriers by a police officer who witnessed the crime or an employee or person willing to place the offender under citizen’s arrest.
Read more @sfgate .com 1634634037142208275_4081778651

Eager to stiffen its crackdown on an out-of-control fare-evasion problem that’s costing BART an estimated $25 million a year, the transit system’s Board of Directors voted Thursday night to start a proof of payment system that would require riders to show tickets to fare inspectors or police. Despite earlier concerns about the possibility of biased enforcement, directors unanimously approved an ordinance allowing random fare inspections along with a companion ordinance that permits juveniles to be fined without gaining a criminal record.“Fare-paying passengers are uniform in their support for fairness,” said Director Robert Raburn of Oakland. “They don’t want to see people skipping through and not paying anything.”Beginning Jan. 1, BART riders inside the paid areas of stations and aboard trains will be required, if asked, to prove they’ve paid by handing their paper tickets or Clipper cards to fare inspectors or police, who will use electronic devices to read them. Adult violators could face fines of up to $120, and youths ages 5 to 17 could be subject to $60 fines. The board, however, agreed to initially limit fines to $75 for adults and $60 for youths. During the first month, warnings will be issued instead of citations. Under the ordinance, low-income earners who are cited will be able to perform community service instead of paying a fine. The goal is to deter fare evaders, who vault the system’s gates or pass through its often-unmonitored swing gates to gain free access. BART officials estimate that fare evasion costs them at least $25 million a year in lost revenue, though they acknowledge that they don’t really know the extent of the problem. What they do know, however, points to widespread abuse. Automated cameras installed to watch just one of 12 swinging gates at Embarcadero Station tallied 600 people sneaking into BART free in a single day. Gate-jumpers and people who sneak in behind a paying customer are common in many stations. Fare evaders can be cited now only at fare gates or other barriers by a police officer who witnessed the crime or an employee or person willing to place the offender under citizen’s arrest. Read more @sfgate .com

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram The United Auto Workers filed a complaint today to the National Relations Board on behalf of hundreds of Tesla factory workers who were fired from the assembly plant last week. The UAW posted a copy of the complaint made against Tesla on its website, which alleges that pro-union workers were unfairly targeted. The UAW says the complaint was made on Wednesday to the Oakland offices of the National Relations Board. The union claims the recent culling of several hundred Tesla employees included many who were involved in a pro-union movement at the Fremont assembly plant, and included those who wore pro-union shirts and stickers.
The Fremont factory site has roots in the UAW. It was once a former joint manufacturing facility owned by GM and Toyota, until it closed in 2010. Despite ongoing efforts, under Tesla’s ownership, the factory is not unionized. A pro-union rally was held Tuesday in front of the plant, which was documented in a Facebook post by the pro-union group A Fair Future at Tesla. UAW SAYS FIRED WORKERS WORE PRO-UNION LOGOS
The UAW’s action follows a lawsuit filed on Tuesday by a former employee. Abraham Duarte’s complaint filed in Alameda County Superior Court alleges Tesla failed to provide adequate notice for layoffs under the California WARN Act, Jalopnik reported. Duarte’s attorney claims Tesla used performance reviews as a cover for company-instituted layoffs so it would not have to provide 60 days of notice to terminate 50 or more employees. In a statement to Jalopnik, Tesla said the terminations were due to performance reviews, and that it is hiring and creating new positions at all of its facilities. AN ESTIMATED 1,200 EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN CUT FROM TESLA THIS MONTH
Since the first terminations at the Fremont factory on October 13th, two lawsuits have been filed against Tesla. The allegations include racial harassment and anti-LGBT harassment at the Fremont facility. Read more @verge .com 1634617052744207172_4081778651

The United Auto Workers filed a complaint today to the National Relations Board on behalf of hundreds of Tesla factory workers who were fired from the assembly plant last week. The UAW posted a copy of the complaint made against Tesla on its website, which alleges that pro-union workers were unfairly targeted. The UAW says the complaint was made on Wednesday to the Oakland offices of the National Relations Board. The union claims the recent culling of several hundred Tesla employees included many who were involved in a pro-union movement at the Fremont assembly plant, and included those who wore pro-union shirts and stickers. The Fremont factory site has roots in the UAW. It was once a former joint manufacturing facility owned by GM and Toyota, until it closed in 2010. Despite ongoing efforts, under Tesla’s ownership, the factory is not unionized. A pro-union rally was held Tuesday in front of the plant, which was documented in a Facebook post by the pro-union group A Fair Future at Tesla. UAW SAYS FIRED WORKERS WORE PRO-UNION LOGOS The UAW’s action follows a lawsuit filed on Tuesday by a former employee. Abraham Duarte’s complaint filed in Alameda County Superior Court alleges Tesla failed to provide adequate notice for layoffs under the California WARN Act, Jalopnik reported. Duarte’s attorney claims Tesla used performance reviews as a cover for company-instituted layoffs so it would not have to provide 60 days of notice to terminate 50 or more employees. In a statement to Jalopnik, Tesla said the terminations were due to performance reviews, and that it is hiring and creating new positions at all of its facilities. AN ESTIMATED 1,200 EMPLOYEES HAVE BEEN CUT FROM TESLA THIS MONTH Since the first terminations at the Fremont factory on October 13th, two lawsuits have been filed against Tesla. The allegations include racial harassment and anti-LGBT harassment at the Fremont facility. Read more @verge .com

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram CLEVELAND — A 10-year-old boy stole his mother’s car and led police on a high-speed chase Thursday, authorities say. Cleveland police say it’s the second time in two weeks the boy has taken cars on joyrides.The chase began in Cleveland and ended on the Ohio Turnpike near Sandusky, police say.Authorities say no one was injured during the pursuit that began around 9:30 a.m. Thursday when Westlake police saw a car speed by chased by another vehicle, possibly driven by the boy’s mother, on Interstate 90 west of Cleveland.A man called 911 and reported the boy’s car was swerving in and out of traffic and had almost run several vehicles off the road. He also said a woman was following him in a red SUV. A woman called 911 and said the boy appeared to be driving around 90 mph.
Three Westlake officers tried to stop the 2004 Toyota Avalon along the interstate and followed it for more than 15 miles high speeds until the boy drove through a toll booth and entered the westbound lanes of the Ohio Turnpike, Westlake police Capt. Guy Turner said.
Highway Patrol Sgt. Tim Hoffman said that’s when at least four state troopers began joining the chase and attempted a rolling roadblock as the boy drove erratically along the turnpike with speeds reaching 100 mph. After a pursuit of around 20 miles, the boy slowed down and veered onto the grassy berm to avoid driving over stop sticks, Hoffman said. That’s when one trooper nudged the boy’s car at a slow speed into a mile post sign with his cruiser, and another cruiser blocked the car and prevented it from re-entering the road, Hoffman said.
“It was very lucky no one was hurt,” Hoffman said.
Read more @usatoday .com 1634569585092977458_4081778651

CLEVELAND — A 10-year-old boy stole his mother’s car and led police on a high-speed chase Thursday, authorities say. Cleveland police say it’s the second time in two weeks the boy has taken cars on joyrides.The chase began in Cleveland and ended on the Ohio Turnpike near Sandusky, police say.Authorities say no one was injured during the pursuit that began around 9:30 a.m. Thursday when Westlake police saw a car speed by chased by another vehicle, possibly driven by the boy’s mother, on Interstate 90 west of Cleveland.A man called 911 and reported the boy’s car was swerving in and out of traffic and had almost run several vehicles off the road. He also said a woman was following him in a red SUV. A woman called 911 and said the boy appeared to be driving around 90 mph. Three Westlake officers tried to stop the 2004 Toyota Avalon along the interstate and followed it for more than 15 miles high speeds until the boy drove through a toll booth and entered the westbound lanes of the Ohio Turnpike, Westlake police Capt. Guy Turner said. Highway Patrol Sgt. Tim Hoffman said that’s when at least four state troopers began joining the chase and attempted a rolling roadblock as the boy drove erratically along the turnpike with speeds reaching 100 mph. After a pursuit of around 20 miles, the boy slowed down and veered onto the grassy berm to avoid driving over stop sticks, Hoffman said. That’s when one trooper nudged the boy’s car at a slow speed into a mile post sign with his cruiser, and another cruiser blocked the car and prevented it from re-entering the road, Hoffman said. “It was very lucky no one was hurt,” Hoffman said. Read more @usatoday .com

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram Bitcoin is a next-gen, all-digital currency that’s already a global phenomenon.

Developed with high levels of security and anonymity in mind, it’s touted as a potential replacement for paper- and coin-based money in the near future.

Some industries, including real estate, are capitalizing on this emerging trend by letting clients buy property via Bitcoin. It’s a significant departure from tradition, but it’s one that is quickly gaining momentum. Read more @cointelegraph .com 1634351927961421882_4081778651

Bitcoin is a next-gen, all-digital currency that’s already a global phenomenon. Developed with high levels of security and anonymity in mind, it’s touted as a potential replacement for paper- and coin-based money in the near future. Some industries, including real estate, are capitalizing on this emerging trend by letting clients buy property via Bitcoin. It’s a significant departure from tradition, but it’s one that is quickly gaining momentum. Read more @cointelegraph .com

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram Nutrition facts labels are clunky and hard to understand, leading most Americans to ignore them.
Vivek Menon, a 21-year old student and design intern at IBM, came up with an alternative that's easy to read and understand.
The re-designed label uses a colored chart to show where the calories in your food come from - whether it's carbs, fats, or protein.
The chart could help people better understand their food and eat healthier. What's black-and-white, clunky, and impossible for 90% of Americans to read?
A standard nutrition label. The receipt-size panels are unwieldy things, sometimes listing up to 25 different food components at time. This makes sizing up the healthiness of a bag of chips or a box of crackers a tall order.
The Food and Drug Administration has made several attempts to improve upon its original 1990s-era design, but most Americans still have no idea what's in the food they are eating, and it's not hard to see why.
Vivek Menon, a 21-year-old student and design intern at IBM, came up with an alternative that makes it easy to visualize how healthy something actually is.
The brilliance of Menon's design is in its simplicity.
"I attempted to structure the unstructured data [of the current label]," Menon told Business Insider.Instead of listing an item's calorie count at the top and then listing its carbohydrates, proteins, and fats beneath a bunch of black lines (as the current label does), the chart shows you where the calories in your food come from all at once in a way that's simple to understand. In the chart above - a redesigned version of a nutrition label from a package of whole grain rolled oats - you can see that most of the calories come from carbohydrates, or the nutritional components of food that our bodies break down quickly into fuel. A smaller portion come from fats, and only a very small portion come from proteins. Read more @businessinsider .com 1634313403346229833_4081778651

Nutrition facts labels are clunky and hard to understand, leading most Americans to ignore them. Vivek Menon, a 21-year old student and design intern at IBM, came up with an alternative that's easy to read and understand. The re-designed label uses a colored chart to show where the calories in your food come from - whether it's carbs, fats, or protein. The chart could help people better understand their food and eat healthier. What's black-and-white, clunky, and impossible for 90% of Americans to read? A standard nutrition label. The receipt-size panels are unwieldy things, sometimes listing up to 25 different food components at time. This makes sizing up the healthiness of a bag of chips or a box of crackers a tall order. The Food and Drug Administration has made several attempts to improve upon its original 1990s-era design, but most Americans still have no idea what's in the food they are eating, and it's not hard to see why. Vivek Menon, a 21-year-old student and design intern at IBM, came up with an alternative that makes it easy to visualize how healthy something actually is. The brilliance of Menon's design is in its simplicity. "I attempted to structure the unstructured data [of the current label]," Menon told Business Insider.Instead of listing an item's calorie count at the top and then listing its carbohydrates, proteins, and fats beneath a bunch of black lines (as the current label does), the chart shows you where the calories in your food come from all at once in a way that's simple to understand. In the chart above - a redesigned version of a nutrition label from a package of whole grain rolled oats - you can see that most of the calories come from carbohydrates, or the nutritional components of food that our bodies break down quickly into fuel. A smaller portion come from fats, and only a very small portion come from proteins. Read more @businessinsider .com

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Explore newstanddaily's Instagram We asked experts from TopResume to make over the résumé of a professional with enough experience to no longer be considered entry-level.The experts top-loaded the résumé, made it easier to read, and emphasized job experience over college experience.You can use these tips to make over your own résumé. It may not feel like it, but once you've got a few years of job experience under your belt, you're not an entry-level employee anymore — you're mid-level.

Your approach to finding a job will need to change accordingly.

No longer can you rely on what you did in college to impress potential employers — now it's up to you to convey what you've learned and accomplished in the working world.

With a diverse range of positions over the past five years, Lucy (not her real name) wanted to find a job supporting the administration in higher education, but her résumé, which read more like that of an entry-level worker, wasn't landing her interviews.

As part of Business Insider's résumé makeover series with TopResume, we thought we could help.
We asked Joe S., a résumé writer with TopResume, to rewrite Lucy's résumé and make it more appropriate for a mid-level employee looking to transition careers.
Joe focused on highlighting the hard and soft skills Lucy has acquired from her various positions. He also emphasized her experience in teaching to position her for entry into a role more focused on learning and development.Amanda Augustine, the career advice expert for TopResume, explains some of the changes Joe made to Lucy's résumé to prepare her for the job search.
While your résumé may look different, these specific pointers should help you overhaul your own résumé: go read more @businessinsider .com 1634211001637203457_4081778651

We asked experts from TopResume to make over the résumé of a professional with enough experience to no longer be considered entry-level.The experts top-loaded the résumé, made it easier to read, and emphasized job experience over college experience.You can use these tips to make over your own résumé. It may not feel like it, but once you've got a few years of job experience under your belt, you're not an entry-level employee anymore — you're mid-level. Your approach to finding a job will need to change accordingly. No longer can you rely on what you did in college to impress potential employers — now it's up to you to convey what you've learned and accomplished in the working world. With a diverse range of positions over the past five years, Lucy (not her real name) wanted to find a job supporting the administration in higher education, but her résumé, which read more like that of an entry-level worker, wasn't landing her interviews. As part of Business Insider's résumé makeover series with TopResume, we thought we could help. We asked Joe S., a résumé writer with TopResume, to rewrite Lucy's résumé and make it more appropriate for a mid-level employee looking to transition careers. Joe focused on highlighting the hard and soft skills Lucy has acquired from her various positions. He also emphasized her experience in teaching to position her for entry into a role more focused on learning and development.Amanda Augustine, the career advice expert for TopResume, explains some of the changes Joe made to Lucy's résumé to prepare her for the job search. While your résumé may look different, these specific pointers should help you overhaul your own résumé: go read more @businessinsider .com

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